Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices
Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Whether you are studying for fun or for a career in business, diplomacy or translation, learning a language can be one of the most challenging and rewarding things you have ever seen.

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Many studies have indicated that multilinguals make more money, are open to more professional opportunities and can provide more value to the companies they work in, either in junior positions or as leaders. People who speak multiple languages ​​also have a higher degree of monolingualism in creativity tests and are more willing than their peers to deal with cultural diversity in our increasingly globalized world.

Especially if you are learning a foreign language for the first time, or if your source and destination languages ​​have a few common points, you should do everything possible to make the learning process as versatile and fun as possible. An excellent way to do this is through music.

Here are some tips on how to make the most of them:

Find the music you love

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

This is probably the easiest step for most language students, as those who want to learn a particular language are often driven by interest in the surrounding culture. Create a playlist in your target language. Use your mobile phone or iPod to transfer and listen throughout the day.

Read (and sing) together

When you discover music you enjoy in your target language, use the Internet to your advantage. Find words and keep reading. Try to recognize the words you hear inside the text, distinguishing the sounds of each word. You may be your best ally, such as automatic translation apps that give you the option to listen to the words you translate.
By reading aloud or singing, you can practice pronunciation without axes and without the stress of real-time interaction.

Translate, rewrite and play with lyrics

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Music for Language Learning: Best Practices

Play with words translated, cut, rewritten.
By learning through song lyrics, you interact with words as they were used by an artist, to create a certain effect, convey an idea or explore a feeling. By treating language as used by an native speaker, with a different function to teach him to speak, he understands how language works in the real world. This is not just about vocabulary or grammar choices: you will understand how the language flows, how long the sentences are, and how the language is flexible or solid.

As Claudia S. Salcedo noted in a 2010 study on the effectiveness of using songs to teach a second language:

“The song is the perfect marriage of poetry and music and is one of the most authentic expressions of people, their feelings and their daily lives” (…) Music can empower students with the world’s communicating feature In fact, the song tells a story set in music; Examples of authentic but slow, rhythmic and repetitive speech. ”

With the help of a dictionary, fellow student, or an automatic translation tool (maximum 2 to 5 uses), translate the lyrics to your native language.

Once you’ve got enough vocabulary, be creative: rewrite letters, replace words with synonyms, rearrange verses, and try to make them rhyme, play.

 


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